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A majority (68%) of licensed teen drivers who used drugs report that they also __________. A. Drink and drive B. Don't wear seat belts C. Drug and drive D. Speed

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A majority (68%) of licensed teen drivers who used drugs report that they also __________. A. Drink and drive B. Don’t wear seat belts C. Drug and drive D. Speed

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A majority (68%) of licensed teen drivers who used drugs report that they also __________. A. Drink and drive B. Don’t wear seat belts C. Drug and drive D. Speed

A majority (68%) of licensed teen drivers who used drugs report that they also Drug and drive.

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What do a majority of licensed teen drivers who use drugs also… – Related Questions. What percent of licensed teen drivers who use drugs regularly report they drug and drive? Are prescription drugs from Canada legal? Canadians can legally obtain domestic prescription drugs at licensed pharmacies. Report illegal sale of prescription drugs?of license teen drivers who use drugs regurlarly report they a. I lost my drivers license 9 years ago for dwi for a 2 year suspension was supposed to Report. This answer closely relates to: 68 of teen drivers who used drugs also used. When you turn 18 do your points on your drivers license drop…image captionThe Johnson & Johnson vaccine was cleared for use in the US in February. The US, South Africa and European Union will temporarily stop the rollout of Following the advice, all federal sites in the US have stopped using the vaccine until further investigations into its safety are completed.

A majority (68%) of licensed teen drivers who used drugs report… – In the United States, teenagers drive less than all but the oldest people, but their numbers of crashes and crash deaths are disproportionately high. Graduated driver licensing laws and insurance collision claim frequencies of teenage drivers. Arlington, VA: Highway Loss Data Institute.Drugged out or sober, anything goes. Keep the comments respectful where mental disorders are concerned, and remember that the individuals depicted in these videos are real people too. This subreddit is essentially dedicated to their worst moments, so do keep that in mind.Statistics show that drug use by British teenagers has doubled since1989. I lalf teenagers who were interviewed admitted they had tried atleast one type of drug. Many teenagers try drugs as a 'dare' to show their friends that they arenot scared. Often their friends insist until the person says 'yes'.

A majority (68%) of licensed teen drivers who used drugs report...

Johnson & Johnson vaccine paused over rare blood clots – BBC News – He also retweeted another statement from Parler user @StormIsUponUs who explained, "Sleep well tonight patriots. Now, Trump is likely preparing to invoke the Insurrection Act or some other form of military authority to conduct mass arrests of the traitors who have betrayed this nation (which now…They may mistakenly think that those who use drugs lack moral principles or willpower and that they could stop their drug use simply by choosing to. In reality, drug addiction is a complex disease, and quitting usually takes more than good intentions or a strong will.Speed Drink and drive Don't wear seat belts Drug and drive. the majority of drivers involved in collisions are people who have a _____driving record.

The Tragic Stories Behind Pop's Biggest Stars – At first glance, it seems like most pop stars 
really do have it all.
But look past the music,   and you'll find that some of the world's 
most beloved performers have lived deeply   troubled lives. Here are the tragic 
stories behind pop's biggest stars. In rock and roll's early days, many 
parents referred to the music that   entertained their children 
as "devil's music." Indeed,   religious parents and secular music tend to 
mix like oil and a match. Just ask Katy Perry. Once upon a time, Perry's 
parents, Keith and Mary Hudson,   were far from the ultra-religious couple 
that the young singer came to know.   In the 1960s, the pair were caught up in that 
decade's iconic counterculture, hanging out   with celebrities and using psychedelic drugs. 
Mary Hudson even dated rock singer Jimi Hendrix,   while Keith Hudson helped manufacture and sell 
LSD for the famed psychologist Timothy Leary. By the end of the 1970s, however, the Hudsons had 
swapped their peace signs for crucifixes, having   become Pentecostal preachers. In a 2011 interview 
with Vanity Fair, Perry told stories about her   strict Christian upbringing. For example, she was 
forbidden to use words such as "deviled eggs,"   once picketed a Marilyn Manson concert 
and, when she decided to become a musician,   released a self-titled Christian album 
before converting to mainstream pop. Tabloid stories have since suggested 
that Perry's parents disavowed her music,   insisting that she had been lured away by Satan.   Perry does still sometimes make public 
appearances with them, so it's clear they're   still close — but the singer has never had any 
trouble pushing back on her parents' beliefs. Pink Floyd were one of the most iconic bands 
of the 20th century, and much of the group's   success came thanks to the talent of lead 
guitarist and singer/songwriter Syd Barrett.   The band's iconic first album would be 
the only one to feature Barrett, however,   as his mental illness and spiralling addiction 
to drugs ended up destroying his career. Barrett co-founded the band in 1965 
while in college with Roger Waters,   Nick Mason, and Richard Wright. 
At the same time, however,   Barrett had begun to use psychedelic drugs, which 
famously came to influence the group's work. Following the release of their first 
album, Barrett's drug addiction worsened,   as did his mental and physical health. Nowadays, 
it's believed that he suffered from undiagnosed   schizophrenia, but the true nature of his 
illness simply wasn't understood at the time.   As Roger Waters later pointed out: "If you were in the position of being 
an incipient schizophrenic like he was,   any hallucinogens are a very bad thing." By March 1968, Barrett was no longer a part of 
the group, having been replaced by Dave Gilmour.   Barrett then recorded two solo albums 
with the help of his former bandmates   and attempted to form a number of 
new bands, with little to no success.   Barrett soon disappeared from public 
life, and died in 2006 at the age of 60. Nicknamed "The King of R&B," Bobby Brown's 
success in the music industry was preceded by   a truly difficult childhood. By the time Brown 
was 11, he was already a member of a gang.   He had been shot, stabbed, and had even 
watched a childhood friend bleed to death.   Brown was able to overcome all of this early 
trauma, however, to achieve success both as   a member of New Edition and as a solo artist. 
But things didn't get much easier from there. In September 1995, while exiting a bar, Brown's 
bodyguard and his younger sister's fiancé were   gunned down. Brown barely escaped with his 
life. In 1992, Brown married the iconic singer   Whitney Houston. The marriage was marred with 
drug abuse and allegations of physical abuse,   and the pair split in 2007. Five years later, 
Houston died of an accidental drowning at age 48.   In 2015, Bobbi Kristina, the couple's daughter, 
died in a similar circumstance at age 22. Both   women had drugs in their systems at the time 
of their death. And then, to top it all off,   Brown's son from another relationship, Bobby Brown 
Jr, died in November 2020, at just 28 years old. Over the course of 2020, the conservatorship 
of Britney Spears has become a long-running   and controversial story. It began in 
2008 when Spears' father, Jamie Spears,   was granted a temporary conservatorship over his 
daughter. This came after his daughter suffered   a very public mental breakdown in 2007. The 
episode included her shaving off her own hair,   driving with her young son on her lap, and 
attacking a cameraman with an umbrella. The conservatorship has been marred with 
controversy, however including the allegation that   Jamie Spears had briefly held the singer against 
her will in a psychiatric facility in early 2019.   In response, a "Free Britney" movement sprung up, 
supported by the ACLU and a number of celebrities. In September 2019, Jamie Spears temporarily 
stepped down from this role over his own   health concerns, and the responsibility was 
handed to Britney's longtime "care manager,"   Jodi Montgomery. However, People magazine 
reported in August 2020 that Britney strongly   opposed Jaime returning to the conservatorship. 
Her attorneys subsequently filed a motion to   remove him permanently from the role, hoping to 
replace him with a qualified corporate fiduciary.   Unfortunately for Britney, the judge 
sided with Jaime Spears in her ruling. The story of Marvin Gaye's death at the hands 
of his father remains one of music history's   most disturbing tales. Gaye became 
highly renowned during his career,   but he also struggled with substance abuse 
and depression and it's easy to see why. Marvin Jr. was one of four children between Marvin 
Sr. and Alberta Cooper. Marvin Jr.'s father was a   Pentecostal preacher, and he frequently beat 
his children. Marvin Jr.'s sister, Jeanne,   later said that from age 7 to his teen years, 
Marvin's life was filled with "brutal whippings".   Discussing the relationship between father and 
son, Gaye's biographer Steve Turner writes: "Marvin's relationship with his father made 
him who he was. His need to be successful,   find love, and then take drugs… No 
matter what he achieved with his songs,   all he got was resentment and criticism." In 1984, Gaye attempted to intervene 
in a fight between his parents.   During the confrontation, Marvin Sr. shot his 
son in the heart and shoulder. The legendary   singer died just one day before his 45th 
birthday. Marvin Sr. pleaded guilty to   voluntary manslaughter and received a six-year 
suspended sentence. He died of pneumonia in 1998. There's a long list of pop stars who hid or 
downplayed their sexuality in order to maintain   their careers. From Dusty Springfield to Elton 
John and Liberace to George Michael, countless   artists have been forced to remain in the closet, 
with only select people knowing the truth.   In an interview on Watch What Happens 
Live with Andy Cohen, singer Patti Labelle   discussed her late friend Luther Vandross, 
and his decision to remain in the closet. LaBelle met Vandross when he was just a 
teen, and she was a member of the Bluebelles.   The pair became friends and collaborated 
throughout their careers. On Cohen's show   in 2017, LaBelle was asked about why 
she thought Vandross hid his sexuality. "And he had a lot of lady fans and he told me 
the he just didn’t want to upset the world." Vandross died in 2005 of a heart attack, 
having never publicly come out of the closet.   In the music industry, however, Vandross' true 
sexuality wasn't much of a secret. In 2006, his   friend Bruce Vilanch wrote a feature in Out 
detailing Vandross' life in the LGBT community.   According to Vilanch, Vandross' longest 
relationship was with another man,   who he lived with between 
the 1980s and early 1990s. When Mariah Carey burst onto the music scene at 
the beginning of the 1990s, her voice alone made   her an instant and iconic superstar. While she 
found further success during that decade, she also   found success in love — or so she hoped — when she 
married the chairman of Sony Music, Tommy Mottola.   Unfortunately, when later describing the failed 
marriage, Carey described herself as a "child   bride," referencing both their age difference and 
the uneven power dynamic within the relationship. Carey has admitted that, while not 
being physically attracted to Mottola,   she still trusted him when they married in 1993.   Carey described the couple's home as "Sing 
Sing," referencing the maximum-security prison   in New York as Mottola had armed guards 
and security cameras around their house. According to Carey, their relationship 
was manipulative and violent.   Mottola controlled Carey's 
career and musical direction.   He also wanted Carey to be more "mainstream," 
which she took to mean more white. And in   one disturbing episode, Mottola threatened 
her by holding a butter knife to her face. In his own autobiography, 
Hitmaker: The Man and His Music,   Mottola acknowledges their relationship 
as "absolutely wrong and inappropriate,"   though he also denied that he was a 
controlling husband. The pair divorced in 1998. Eminem's story very much matches the "rags 
to riches" story so often found in hip hop.   Born Marshall Mathers, Eminem's father left 
the family when the rapper was just a toddler   and frequently rebuked his son's attempts to 
contact him, leaving the family in poverty. Eminem and his mother, Debbie, moved 
around the country looking for work,   pulling him in and out of school multiple 
times a year. This led the young boy to   develop a loner personality and even being 
labeled mentally disabled by teachers.   Inevitably, bullying soon followed. The worst 
incident led to Eminem being put into a coma   and having to relearn his motor skills. 
On his 1999 album, The Slim Shady LP,   rapped about the incident on the song, "Brain 
Damage." The bully mentioned in the song,   D'Angelo Bailey, sued the rapper for using his 
name — though the judge ruled in Eminem's favor. On top of all this, Eminem's relationship 
with his mother was strained. In the song,   "Cleaning Out my Closet," he raps about her 
failures as a parent. Debbie later sued her   son for defamation of character, demanding  
million, though she received only 10,600 of the   ,000 settlement agreed upon. Eventually, the 
two reconciled, and are now on better terms. In-band couples have produced some of the greatest 
pop music of all time. Much of the time, however,   these relationships have come to an end and the 
bands often go with them. Lauryn Hill's time with   The Fugees saw her and bandmate Wyclef Jean go 
through this particular emotional rollercoaster. The Fugees formed in 1992 and featured Hill,   Wyclef Jean, and Pras Michel. By 
the time they had broken up in 1997,   they had just released their most commercial 
and critically successful work, The Score.   And the untimely break-up of the band was due in 
large part to a break-up between Hill and Jean. Following the end of the Fugees and the success 
of her first solo album, Hill began to spend time   with a spiritual advisor named Brother Anthony, 
who some have likened to the leader of a cult.   During this time, she fired her management 
team and became more secluded. Those around   her were wary of Anthony, however, believing 
he was preying on her vulnerabilities and   pushing her to be more outspoken. Hill herself has 
endured further controversies in the years since,   although Brother Anthony's 
ultimate fate remains unknown. Sinead O'Connor's childhood was one of emotional, 
physical, and sexual torment suffered at the hands   of her mother. O'Connor's mother died in a car 
crash in 1986, before O'Connor's debut album was   released something she didn't seem all that torn 
up about during a later interview with Dr. Phil. "What do you love about your mother?" "The first thing that came to mind, 
actually, is that she's dead." O'Connor's mother, Marie, was a dressmaker 
who gave up her career to raise her   and her three siblings. The singer believed the   lack of a creative outlet and postnatal 
depression sparked her abusive behavior.   O'Connor's father, Sean, moved out of their home, 
leaving the children with their disturbed mother. O'Connor later described the home as a 
"torture chamber" and theorized that her   mother was either "a sadist and a pedophile, or 
she was possessed by the devil." She recalled   that between the ages of 3 to 12, she was 
assaulted several times, and attempted suicide   several times in a single year. O'Connor finally 
escaped her mother's home at 13 years old. .

I am not a "Cyclist" (and most Dutch people aren't either) – (birds chirping)
(bicycle bell) I am not a cyclist I'm not particularly fond of bicycles
I don't care about the latest bicycle technologies  I don't read about bicycle gear
I don't watch bicycle racing  I don't go on vacation to cycle
I don't cycle for sport  There's literally nothing wrong with 
liking any of these things of course  It's just not who I am I do ride a bicycle almost every day though
along with hundreds of other   people who are also not cyclists
at least not by the definition you'll hear   in most English-speaking countries
Let me explain I grew up in a typical North American 
car-infested city called London Ontario Canada  I and everybody else around me knew 
that bicycles were just for little kids  So when I turned 16
I ditched the bike  got a driver's license
and started driving a car  Like the rest of the adults
Well my parents car at least When I graduated university, moved 
to the big city and started working  I took public transit to work
But there was a problem  Because Canadian cities are built wrong  and let their public transit 
vehicles get stuck in traffic  This meant that my commute was highly 
unreliable and sometimes painfully slow  I worked downtown and had no parking spot at work
not that i could afford a car anyway  so that option was out
So I did something I thought i'd never do  When i was 27 years old I 
broke down and bought a bicycle  This made my commute to work a lot more reliable  but it was still pretty terrible
At the time Toronto had very few bicycle lanes  certainly none along my route
and every ride was dangerous and stressful A few years later I got a new higher 
paying job that was out in suburbia  so i did what everyone does
ditched the bike and bought a car  Which started several years of the 
absolute worst commutes of my life  There's a reason they call 
it the Don Valley Parking Lot But then my wife and I moved to the UK
I would take the train up to Cambridge each day  and then the bus into work  I soon learned that it was faster 
to cycle (than to take the bus)  So I dusted off the old bike 
and started cycling again Over the next few years we lived 
in many different countries  and I used whatever method 
got me to work the fastest  In Taipei it was by metro
In Brussels it was by car  When we moved back to Toronto it 
was fastest to take the subway  I didn't care how I traveled I just 
did whatever was most convenient  Over the years I've learned 
there really aren't that many  car people, train people
or bicycle people  The vast majority of people  just want to get from point A to point B
as quickly and efficiently as possible A few years later I once again got a job 
where it was fastest to go by bicycle  So I did that
But what I didn't realize  is that there had been a change in the culture
from the last time I had cycled to work   in Toronto over 10 years earlier
Because now I wasn't just a guy riding   his bike to work
I was a  CYCLIST
(scary roar) The first time I realized this I was 
having a discussion with co-workers  I don't remember what we were talking about
but I remember it had nothing to do with bicycles  and yet after I said something
my manager responded with  Well you would say that  You're a cyclist
(Lasagna Cat laugh track) This really took me by surprise
as I had never thought of myself that way  I mean sure
I sometimes rode my bike to   various jobs over the past 15 years
but only out of convenience  What was even more bizarre was that I 
had taken the streetcar to work that day  So how was I a "cyclist"
When I hadn't even cycled? I quickly learned that in many car centric cities
when you decide to start riding a bike  you implicitly agree to becoming a part of a group  a "cyclist"
This comes with it   many assumptions and stereotypes
almost all of them negative  For example
people expected me to   become a spokesperson for "cyclists"
It was literally every other week  that my wife or I
would have someone say to us  oh you're a cyclist?
ugh  "I once saw this cyclist …
"
Which would inevitably devolve  into a long angry rant
about some minor traffic violation  and usually ended with something like
"I hope you're not like one of THEM"  We were then expected to either agree with them  or justify this behavior somehow
on behalf of our fellow "cyclists"  Somehow drivers were never 
held to this same standard This got to be so absurd
that whenever my wife or I would hear about   the regular occurrences of a driver in Toronto
running a red light  driving twice the speed
limit crashing into a building  or killing yet another person on a sidewalk
we would just respond with  yeah, but I once saw this cyclist run a stop sign It's exhausting
being expected to be held accountable  for everything any person 
on a bicycle has ever done  My wife had it worse than me
because she worked mostly with people   who would drive downtown from the suburbs
and since she wasn't a man   between the age of 20 to 35
she didn't fit the "cyclist" stereotype Why do you ride a bicycle?
They'd ask  Are you some kind of tree hugger or something?  Or a hippie?
Why would you do that? It's bizarre how much the 
topic of riding a bicycle  triggers an emotional and even angry response
out of seemingly normal people  And it's very telling
in English-speaking countries  when people will routinely complain 
about some idiot in a car they saw  but it's never an idiot on a bike
It's those damn "cyclists"  It doesn't matter that every study ever done  into the behavior of cyclists
has shown they break the law   less often than drivers do
The stereotypes remain  The one crazy "cyclist" 
sticks out in a driver's mind  while they don't even notice the dozens 
of quiet cyclists right beside them  who are just trying to get to 
where they're going without dying These stereotypes have serious consequences
One particularly sad story was that of Tom Samson  a teacher in Toronto
who was killed while riding his bicycle to work When police arrived
they didn't bother to   do a proper investigation
because it was so obvious:  this guy was a "cyclist"
and "cyclists" always run red lights, right?  Obviously this time it got him killed
Case closed But to anyone that knew Tom
they knew the pieces didn't fit  He wasn't someone who would 
take risks when cycling  but the police wouldn't listen
so his widow had to hire a   private investigator
and uncover the truth: Tom had been waiting to 
turn left at this red light  and was rear-ended by a driver 
who wasn't paying attention  sending him into the intersection
where he was hit by another vehicle  killing him Tom wasn't just some "scofflaw cyclist"
he was a husband and father  riding his bike to work
on streets that are dangerous   and unforgiving to people outside of a car
and his family deserves a fair and complete   investigation from the police
just like anyone else Of course
eight years later  no changes have been made to improve 
the safety of this intersection  which is sadly typical for Canada But the topic of "cyclists" is complicated
because ultimately  many of the people who ride in car centric places
really do like bicycles  but others do this because they 
feel they have to band together  for their own safety and sanity
against the stereotypes of a car centric society Unfortunately, this makes it 
even more difficult for people  who just want to ride a bicycle
because everywhere from advocacy groups  to local bike shops
to the bicycle lanes themselves  are dominated by people who 
are REALLY into bicycles  and they often have very strong opinions
about what it means to be a "cyclist"  "If you want to ride a bike
you're going to be one of us  and you better do it right
or you'll be 'giving cyclists a bad name'" That's a lot of responsibility
just because you want to get to work faster These divides make the us 
versus them situation even worse  and over the past few years the press 
has been fueling the fires of this divide  The UK press in particular  has gone crazy about reporting on every 
bad thing that a "cyclist" has ever done  People are killed by drivers literally 
every single day on British roads  but when a "cyclist" killed a woman
it was front page news for WEEKS In Canada this anti-cycling messaging
was routinely reinforced  not just by the press
but also by suburban politicians  like the crack-smoking mayor of Toronto
Rob Ford  "the cyclists are a pain in the ass"
"my heart bleeds for them  when I hear someone gets killed
but it's their own fault at the end of the day" "yes I have smoked crack cocaine" The sad truth is that 
labeling people as "cyclists"  dehumanizes them
and puts them in an out-group  that some people believes justifies 
literal violence against them  In many North American, British, and Irish cities
there is a concept of the "punishment pass"  where a driver purposefully drives as 
close as possible to someone on a bicycle  to intimidate them and punish them 
for taking up space on the road I asked on Twitter for examples from the community
and even though I have a much smaller   audience on Twitter
I receive dozens of videos  These close passes may not look close on camera
because of the lenses used on sports cams  but they're really scary in real life
Here's an example from Toronto  of a driver passing so close
that he actually hit the   handlebars of the person cycling
despite a full lane to the left   that could have been used to pass
Many people told me they'd stop cycling  for months years or even forever
because of events like this And then there's "rolling coal"
some diesel truck owners   get their vehicles modified
so that it burns fuel less efficiently  and emits a thick black smoke
Modifications can cost up to five thousand dollars  and are sometimes triggered 
with a switch on the dashboard  They do this so that they can 
punish people who are cycling  or anyone else they don't like
I have lost all hope for humanity There were two times in Toronto
where I was aggressively run off the   road by drivers who hated "cyclists"
and took their anger out on me  Two times where I could have been 
seriously injured or even killed  not because of what I'd done
but because of the group they associated me with  just because I dared to ride 
a bicycle on city streets I totally understand how people become 
the stereotypical "angry cyclist"  as I was starting to become one myself
Because you are constantly judged unfairly  put in a position of having to 
justify the actions of others  and have to put up with literal physical harm
just because of the stereotypes of your group  It was an eye-opening experience for me
because as a straight white cisgender man  I finally internalized what it 
was like to be judged by what   a minority group other people put me in
rather than for anything I'd done myself  The HUGE difference of course
being that I could stop cycling   at any time … So I did … (streetcar sounds)
("next stop: Dufferin street") Taking public transit in mixed traffic
was slow and unreliable  but nobody ever tried to run me over
just because I was a "transitist" I don't want to join a group
I don't want to constantly hear   lame stories of misplaced outrage
I don't want to be responsible   for the actions of others
and I don't want them to   be held responsible for my actions either
I don't want to be forced into a position   of being an activist
a spokesperson  or even an "inspiration to 
others to start cycling"  I just want to get to where I'm 
going quickly and efficiently Thankfully, but far too slowly
things are starting to change  As safer protected bicycle 
infrastructure is installed  It's attracting people of all ages who 
would otherwise never consider cycling  and it's starting to make cycling 
more of a "normal" activity  That exposure is slowly changing the culture again
because it's hard to be "anti-cyclist"  when 10 year co-workers
your sister  and three of your friends
ride a bike It's one of those things 
I didn't really appreciate  until I was living in the Netherlands for a while
I can buy groceries  visit friends
get to work  and take the kids to school
however I want  Nobody questions my choice
Nobody judges me for the actions of others  And nobody screams at me
honks at me  or tries to run me off the road
Here I'm never a "cyclist"  I'm just another guy
riding a bicycle I'd like to take this opportunity
to thank my supporters on Patreon  who pay me to complain about 
people who complain about cyclists  If you'd like to support the channel  and get access to bonus videos
visit patreon.com/notjustbikes .

How the Drug War Destroyed a Hippie Paradise in Kathmandu – Whether it's mountaineering, or marijuana.
Trekking to Everest, or tripping on LSD. Getting as high as you can has always been central to the Nepal tourist experience. This is the story of an American president who tried to nip communism in the bud by destroying a Himalayan hippie shangri-la. But in stopping the smokers he sparked a Maoist blowback. The hippie trail followed the footsteps
of the ancient Silk Road. But instead of trading textiles, its travelers swapped the post-war social conformity of the Western world for dreams of enlightenment in the East. Some were fleeing the Vietnam War draft, while others came to find themselves. For whatever reason, every year from 1965 to 1973, tens of thousands of young people bussed or hitch-hiked the overland route from Istanbul to Kathmandu. And the terminus of the hippie trail was a
single bustling urban lane, called Jhonche, rechristened by its new inhabitants as Freak Street. America's public enemy number one in the United States, is drug abuse. This will be a worldwide offensive, dealing with the problems of sources of supply as well as Americans who may be stationed abroad wherever they are in the world. A number of young Americans have become addicts as they serve abroad. Whether in Vietnam or Europe, or other places. Whether or not these young men are tuned in, they've certainly dropped out of the society they knew. Together they've quietly rejected the practical Western world, and seem not at all sure that they'll ever want to return. The hippies weren't the only ones
angered by prohibition. In western Nepal, far from the capital city of Kathmandu, hashish cultivation was the primary source of income. Sellers and growers were arrested. Private property with marijuana growing on it was forfeited to the state. The destruction of the marijuana crops pushed tens of thousands of subsistence farmers to the brink of starvation. Seeing political opportunity in economic
collapse, a communist party exploited local grievances, and persuaded residents that only a violent overthrow of the government would solve their problems. Nixon's global war on drugs was fueling
the communist ideology he was trying to contain. And we will never surrender our
friends to communist aggression. By the "Just Say No" Reagan-era, drug prohibition had opened new opportunities for corruption that led all the way to Nepal's royal family. King Birendra and I have each discovered a new friend. A blockbuster report by Nepalese journalist, Padam Thakurathi, implicated the king's brothers in Nepal's booming heroin trade. The government immediately shut down Thakurathi's newspaper. Then, at 3 o'clock in the morning, a bodyguard of the royal family entered Thakurathi's home, and aimed a gun 18 inches from his head. Shot in the face, Thakurathi survived the attack. He lost an eye, but lived to expose the royal family's involvement in black-market heroin. This is a quick escape from grim reality. Today, Nepal remains a thriving hub for heroin and hashish. With stories of drug busts, addiction, and violence, mainstays of Nepal's television news coverage. By 2006 the Maoists controlled 80% of
the country. The insurgency based in Roma had grown into a national political force that paralyzed the nation with a series of national strikes and armed resistance to the king. After a decade-long civil war that claimed 17,000 lives, Nepal's monarchy was abolished, and the Communists elected to power. The Maoist have surged ahead past both the mainstream Left Party, the UML, as well as the Nepali Congress. Today, Nepal's political situation has calmed down, and Freak Street is looking a little bit lonely. Katmandu's hippie past is running high
on nostalgia and low on foot traffic. The erstwhile hippie haven is now a hangout for hipsters. Artisanal coffee shops, outnumber head shops. And the old Eden hashish Centre is just an ordinary budget hotel. Despite a small political movement to legalize hashish, marijuana is legal one day a year, for religious purposes only. The rest of the time, tourists and locals take their chances on the black market. With its wild days behind it Freak Street has mostly dropped the drug trade, and reinvented itself as a destination for mountain trekking. These days the real action is in Thamel. A short walk from Freak Street, Kathmandu's thumping nightlife hotspot offers visitors every kind of indulgence that was available during Freak Street's heyday, and many more that the hippies couldn't have imagined on their wildest trip. And a recent retro hit is reviving Kathmandu's hippy heritage. .

The Tragic Stories Behind Pop's Biggest Stars – At first glance, it seems like most pop stars 
really do have it all.
But look past the music,   and you'll find that some of the world's 
most beloved performers have lived deeply   troubled lives. Here are the tragic 
stories behind pop's biggest stars. In rock and roll's early days, many 
parents referred to the music that   entertained their children 
as "devil's music." Indeed,   religious parents and secular music tend to 
mix like oil and a match. Just ask Katy Perry. Once upon a time, Perry's 
parents, Keith and Mary Hudson,   were far from the ultra-religious couple 
that the young singer came to know.   In the 1960s, the pair were caught up in that 
decade's iconic counterculture, hanging out   with celebrities and using psychedelic drugs. 
Mary Hudson even dated rock singer Jimi Hendrix,   while Keith Hudson helped manufacture and sell 
LSD for the famed psychologist Timothy Leary. By the end of the 1970s, however, the Hudsons had 
swapped their peace signs for crucifixes, having   become Pentecostal preachers. In a 2011 interview 
with Vanity Fair, Perry told stories about her   strict Christian upbringing. For example, she was 
forbidden to use words such as "deviled eggs,"   once picketed a Marilyn Manson concert 
and, when she decided to become a musician,   released a self-titled Christian album 
before converting to mainstream pop. Tabloid stories have since suggested 
that Perry's parents disavowed her music,   insisting that she had been lured away by Satan.   Perry does still sometimes make public 
appearances with them, so it's clear they're   still close — but the singer has never had any 
trouble pushing back on her parents' beliefs. Pink Floyd were one of the most iconic bands 
of the 20th century, and much of the group's   success came thanks to the talent of lead 
guitarist and singer/songwriter Syd Barrett.   The band's iconic first album would be 
the only one to feature Barrett, however,   as his mental illness and spiralling addiction 
to drugs ended up destroying his career. Barrett co-founded the band in 1965 
while in college with Roger Waters,   Nick Mason, and Richard Wright. 
At the same time, however,   Barrett had begun to use psychedelic drugs, which 
famously came to influence the group's work. Following the release of their first 
album, Barrett's drug addiction worsened,   as did his mental and physical health. Nowadays, 
it's believed that he suffered from undiagnosed   schizophrenia, but the true nature of his 
illness simply wasn't understood at the time.   As Roger Waters later pointed out: "If you were in the position of being 
an incipient schizophrenic like he was,   any hallucinogens are a very bad thing." By March 1968, Barrett was no longer a part of 
the group, having been replaced by Dave Gilmour.   Barrett then recorded two solo albums 
with the help of his former bandmates   and attempted to form a number of 
new bands, with little to no success.   Barrett soon disappeared from public 
life, and died in 2006 at the age of 60. Nicknamed "The King of R&B," Bobby Brown's 
success in the music industry was preceded by   a truly difficult childhood. By the time Brown 
was 11, he was already a member of a gang.   He had been shot, stabbed, and had even 
watched a childhood friend bleed to death.   Brown was able to overcome all of this early 
trauma, however, to achieve success both as   a member of New Edition and as a solo artist. 
But things didn't get much easier from there. In September 1995, while exiting a bar, Brown's 
bodyguard and his younger sister's fiancé were   gunned down. Brown barely escaped with his 
life. In 1992, Brown married the iconic singer   Whitney Houston. The marriage was marred with 
drug abuse and allegations of physical abuse,   and the pair split in 2007. Five years later, 
Houston died of an accidental drowning at age 48.   In 2015, Bobbi Kristina, the couple's daughter, 
died in a similar circumstance at age 22. Both   women had drugs in their systems at the time 
of their death. And then, to top it all off,   Brown's son from another relationship, Bobby Brown 
Jr, died in November 2020, at just 28 years old. Over the course of 2020, the conservatorship 
of Britney Spears has become a long-running   and controversial story. It began in 
2008 when Spears' father, Jamie Spears,   was granted a temporary conservatorship over his 
daughter. This came after his daughter suffered   a very public mental breakdown in 2007. The 
episode included her shaving off her own hair,   driving with her young son on her lap, and 
attacking a cameraman with an umbrella. The conservatorship has been marred with 
controversy, however including the allegation that   Jamie Spears had briefly held the singer against 
her will in a psychiatric facility in early 2019.   In response, a "Free Britney" movement sprung up, 
supported by the ACLU and a number of celebrities. In September 2019, Jamie Spears temporarily 
stepped down from this role over his own   health concerns, and the responsibility was 
handed to Britney's longtime "care manager,"   Jodi Montgomery. However, People magazine 
reported in August 2020 that Britney strongly   opposed Jaime returning to the conservatorship. 
Her attorneys subsequently filed a motion to   remove him permanently from the role, hoping to 
replace him with a qualified corporate fiduciary.   Unfortunately for Britney, the judge 
sided with Jaime Spears in her ruling. The story of Marvin Gaye's death at the hands 
of his father remains one of music history's   most disturbing tales. Gaye became 
highly renowned during his career,   but he also struggled with substance abuse 
and depression and it's easy to see why. Marvin Jr. was one of four children between Marvin 
Sr. and Alberta Cooper. Marvin Jr.'s father was a   Pentecostal preacher, and he frequently beat 
his children. Marvin Jr.'s sister, Jeanne,   later said that from age 7 to his teen years, 
Marvin's life was filled with "brutal whippings".   Discussing the relationship between father and 
son, Gaye's biographer Steve Turner writes: "Marvin's relationship with his father made 
him who he was. His need to be successful,   find love, and then take drugs… No 
matter what he achieved with his songs,   all he got was resentment and criticism." In 1984, Gaye attempted to intervene 
in a fight between his parents.   During the confrontation, Marvin Sr. shot his 
son in the heart and shoulder. The legendary   singer died just one day before his 45th 
birthday. Marvin Sr. pleaded guilty to   voluntary manslaughter and received a six-year 
suspended sentence. He died of pneumonia in 1998. There's a long list of pop stars who hid or 
downplayed their sexuality in order to maintain   their careers. From Dusty Springfield to Elton 
John and Liberace to George Michael, countless   artists have been forced to remain in the closet, 
with only select people knowing the truth.   In an interview on Watch What Happens 
Live with Andy Cohen, singer Patti Labelle   discussed her late friend Luther Vandross, 
and his decision to remain in the closet. LaBelle met Vandross when he was just a 
teen, and she was a member of the Bluebelles.   The pair became friends and collaborated 
throughout their careers. On Cohen's show   in 2017, LaBelle was asked about why 
she thought Vandross hid his sexuality. "And he had a lot of lady fans and he told me 
the he just didn’t want to upset the world." Vandross died in 2005 of a heart attack, 
having never publicly come out of the closet.   In the music industry, however, Vandross' true 
sexuality wasn't much of a secret. In 2006, his   friend Bruce Vilanch wrote a feature in Out 
detailing Vandross' life in the LGBT community.   According to Vilanch, Vandross' longest 
relationship was with another man,   who he lived with between 
the 1980s and early 1990s. When Mariah Carey burst onto the music scene at 
the beginning of the 1990s, her voice alone made   her an instant and iconic superstar. While she 
found further success during that decade, she also   found success in love — or so she hoped — when she 
married the chairman of Sony Music, Tommy Mottola.   Unfortunately, when later describing the failed 
marriage, Carey described herself as a "child   bride," referencing both their age difference and 
the uneven power dynamic within the relationship. Carey has admitted that, while not 
being physically attracted to Mottola,   she still trusted him when they married in 1993.   Carey described the couple's home as "Sing 
Sing," referencing the maximum-security prison   in New York as Mottola had armed guards 
and security cameras around their house. According to Carey, their relationship 
was manipulative and violent.   Mottola controlled Carey's 
career and musical direction.   He also wanted Carey to be more "mainstream," 
which she took to mean more white. And in   one disturbing episode, Mottola threatened 
her by holding a butter knife to her face. In his own autobiography, 
Hitmaker: The Man and His Music,   Mottola acknowledges their relationship 
as "absolutely wrong and inappropriate,"   though he also denied that he was a 
controlling husband. The pair divorced in 1998. Eminem's story very much matches the "rags 
to riches" story so often found in hip hop.   Born Marshall Mathers, Eminem's father left 
the family when the rapper was just a toddler   and frequently rebuked his son's attempts to 
contact him, leaving the family in poverty. Eminem and his mother, Debbie, moved 
around the country looking for work,   pulling him in and out of school multiple 
times a year. This led the young boy to   develop a loner personality and even being 
labeled mentally disabled by teachers.   Inevitably, bullying soon followed. The worst 
incident led to Eminem being put into a coma   and having to relearn his motor skills. 
On his 1999 album, The Slim Shady LP,   rapped about the incident on the song, "Brain 
Damage." The bully mentioned in the song,   D'Angelo Bailey, sued the rapper for using his 
name — though the judge ruled in Eminem's favor. On top of all this, Eminem's relationship 
with his mother was strained. In the song,   "Cleaning Out my Closet," he raps about her 
failures as a parent. Debbie later sued her   son for defamation of character, demanding  
million, though she received only 2,600 of the   ,000 settlement agreed upon. Eventually, the 
two reconciled, and are now on better terms. In-band couples have produced some of the greatest 
pop music of all time. Much of the time, however,   these relationships have come to an end and the 
bands often go with them. Lauryn Hill's time with   The Fugees saw her and bandmate Wyclef Jean go 
through this particular emotional rollercoaster. The Fugees formed in 1992 and featured Hill,   Wyclef Jean, and Pras Michel. By 
the time they had broken up in 1997,   they had just released their most commercial 
and critically successful work, The Score.   And the untimely break-up of the band was due in 
large part to a break-up between Hill and Jean. Following the end of the Fugees and the success 
of her first solo album, Hill began to spend time   with a spiritual advisor named Brother Anthony, 
who some have likened to the leader of a cult.   During this time, she fired her management 
team and became more secluded. Those around   her were wary of Anthony, however, believing 
he was preying on her vulnerabilities and   pushing her to be more outspoken. Hill herself has 
endured further controversies in the years since,   although Brother Anthony's 
ultimate fate remains unknown. Sinead O'Connor's childhood was one of emotional, 
physical, and sexual torment suffered at the hands   of her mother. O'Connor's mother died in a car 
crash in 1986, before O'Connor's debut album was   released something she didn't seem all that torn 
up about during a later interview with Dr. Phil. "What do you love about your mother?" "The first thing that came to mind, 
actually, is that she's dead." O'Connor's mother, Marie, was a dressmaker 
who gave up her career to raise her   and her three siblings. The singer believed the   lack of a creative outlet and postnatal 
depression sparked her abusive behavior.   O'Connor's father, Sean, moved out of their home, 
leaving the children with their disturbed mother. O'Connor later described the home as a 
"torture chamber" and theorized that her   mother was either "a sadist and a pedophile, or 
she was possessed by the devil." She recalled   that between the ages of 3 to 12, she was 
assaulted several times, and attempted suicide   several times in a single year. O'Connor finally 
escaped her mother's home at 13 years old. .

I am not a "Cyclist" (and most Dutch people aren't either) – (birds chirping)
(bicycle bell) I am not a cyclist I'm not particularly fond of bicycles
I don't care about the latest bicycle technologies  I don't read about bicycle gear
I don't watch bicycle racing  I don't go on vacation to cycle
I don't cycle for sport  There's literally nothing wrong with 
liking any of these things of course  It's just not who I am I do ride a bicycle almost every day though
along with hundreds of other   people who are also not cyclists
at least not by the definition you'll hear   in most English-speaking countries
Let me explain I grew up in a typical North American 
car-infested city called London Ontario Canada  I and everybody else around me knew 
that bicycles were just for little kids  So when I turned 16
I ditched the bike  got a driver's license
and started driving a car  Like the rest of the adults
Well my parents car at least When I graduated university, moved 
to the big city and started working  I took public transit to work
But there was a problem  Because Canadian cities are built wrong  and let their public transit 
vehicles get stuck in traffic  This meant that my commute was highly 
unreliable and sometimes painfully slow  I worked downtown and had no parking spot at work
not that i could afford a car anyway  so that option was out
So I did something I thought i'd never do  When i was 27 years old I 
broke down and bought a bicycle  This made my commute to work a lot more reliable  but it was still pretty terrible
At the time Toronto had very few bicycle lanes  certainly none along my route
and every ride was dangerous and stressful A few years later I got a new higher 
paying job that was out in suburbia  so i did what everyone does
ditched the bike and bought a car  Which started several years of the 
absolute worst commutes of my life  There's a reason they call 
it the Don Valley Parking Lot But then my wife and I moved to the UK
I would take the train up to Cambridge each day  and then the bus into work  I soon learned that it was faster 
to cycle (than to take the bus)  So I dusted off the old bike 
and started cycling again Over the next few years we lived 
in many different countries  and I used whatever method 
got me to work the fastest  In Taipei it was by metro
In Brussels it was by car  When we moved back to Toronto it 
was fastest to take the subway  I didn't care how I traveled I just 
did whatever was most convenient  Over the years I've learned 
there really aren't that many  car people, train people
or bicycle people  The vast majority of people  just want to get from point A to point B
as quickly and efficiently as possible A few years later I once again got a job 
where it was fastest to go by bicycle  So I did that
But what I didn't realize  is that there had been a change in the culture
from the last time I had cycled to work   in Toronto over 10 years earlier
Because now I wasn't just a guy riding   his bike to work
I was a  CYCLIST
(scary roar) The first time I realized this I was 
having a discussion with co-workers  I don't remember what we were talking about
but I remember it had nothing to do with bicycles  and yet after I said something
my manager responded with  Well you would say that  You're a cyclist
(Lasagna Cat laugh track) This really took me by surprise
as I had never thought of myself that way  I mean sure
I sometimes rode my bike to   various jobs over the past 15 years
but only out of convenience  What was even more bizarre was that I 
had taken the streetcar to work that day  So how was I a "cyclist"
When I hadn't even cycled? I quickly learned that in many car centric cities
when you decide to start riding a bike  you implicitly agree to becoming a part of a group  a "cyclist"
This comes with it   many assumptions and stereotypes
almost all of them negative  For example
people expected me to   become a spokesperson for "cyclists"
It was literally every other week  that my wife or I
would have someone say to us  oh you're a cyclist?
ugh  "I once saw this cyclist …
"
Which would inevitably devolve  into a long angry rant
about some minor traffic violation  and usually ended with something like
"I hope you're not like one of THEM"  We were then expected to either agree with them  or justify this behavior somehow
on behalf of our fellow "cyclists"  Somehow drivers were never 
held to this same standard This got to be so absurd
that whenever my wife or I would hear about   the regular occurrences of a driver in Toronto
running a red light  driving twice the speed
limit crashing into a building  or killing yet another person on a sidewalk
we would just respond with  yeah, but I once saw this cyclist run a stop sign It's exhausting
being expected to be held accountable  for everything any person 
on a bicycle has ever done  My wife had it worse than me
because she worked mostly with people   who would drive downtown from the suburbs
and since she wasn't a man   between the age of 20 to 35
she didn't fit the "cyclist" stereotype Why do you ride a bicycle?
They'd ask  Are you some kind of tree hugger or something?  Or a hippie?
Why would you do that? It's bizarre how much the 
topic of riding a bicycle  triggers an emotional and even angry response
out of seemingly normal people  And it's very telling
in English-speaking countries  when people will routinely complain 
about some idiot in a car they saw  but it's never an idiot on a bike
It's those damn "cyclists"  It doesn't matter that every study ever done  into the behavior of cyclists
has shown they break the law   less often than drivers do
The stereotypes remain  The one crazy "cyclist" 
sticks out in a driver's mind  while they don't even notice the dozens 
of quiet cyclists right beside them  who are just trying to get to 
where they're going without dying These stereotypes have serious consequences
One particularly sad story was that of Tom Samson  a teacher in Toronto
who was killed while riding his bicycle to work When police arrived
they didn't bother to   do a proper investigation
because it was so obvious:  this guy was a "cyclist"
and "cyclists" always run red lights, right?  Obviously this time it got him killed
Case closed But to anyone that knew Tom
they knew the pieces didn't fit  He wasn't someone who would 
take risks when cycling  but the police wouldn't listen
so his widow had to hire a   private investigator
and uncover the truth: Tom had been waiting to 
turn left at this red light  and was rear-ended by a driver 
who wasn't paying attention  sending him into the intersection
where he was hit by another vehicle  killing him Tom wasn't just some "scofflaw cyclist"
he was a husband and father  riding his bike to work
on streets that are dangerous   and unforgiving to people outside of a car
and his family deserves a fair and complete   investigation from the police
just like anyone else Of course
eight years later  no changes have been made to improve 
the safety of this intersection  which is sadly typical for Canada But the topic of "cyclists" is complicated
because ultimately  many of the people who ride in car centric places
really do like bicycles  but others do this because they 
feel they have to band together  for their own safety and sanity
against the stereotypes of a car centric society Unfortunately, this makes it 
even more difficult for people  who just want to ride a bicycle
because everywhere from advocacy groups  to local bike shops
to the bicycle lanes themselves  are dominated by people who 
are REALLY into bicycles  and they often have very strong opinions
about what it means to be a "cyclist"  "If you want to ride a bike
you're going to be one of us  and you better do it right
or you'll be 'giving cyclists a bad name'" That's a lot of responsibility
just because you want to get to work faster These divides make the us 
versus them situation even worse  and over the past few years the press 
has been fueling the fires of this divide  The UK press in particular  has gone crazy about reporting on every 
bad thing that a "cyclist" has ever done  People are killed by drivers literally 
every single day on British roads  but when a "cyclist" killed a woman
it was front page news for WEEKS In Canada this anti-cycling messaging
was routinely reinforced  not just by the press
but also by suburban politicians  like the crack-smoking mayor of Toronto
Rob Ford  "the cyclists are a pain in the ass"
"my heart bleeds for them  when I hear someone gets killed
but it's their own fault at the end of the day" "yes I have smoked crack cocaine" The sad truth is that 
labeling people as "cyclists"  dehumanizes them
and puts them in an out-group  that some people believes justifies 
literal violence against them  In many North American, British, and Irish cities
there is a concept of the "punishment pass"  where a driver purposefully drives as 
close as possible to someone on a bicycle  to intimidate them and punish them 
for taking up space on the road I asked on Twitter for examples from the community
and even though I have a much smaller   audience on Twitter
I receive dozens of videos  These close passes may not look close on camera
because of the lenses used on sports cams  but they're really scary in real life
Here's an example from Toronto  of a driver passing so close
that he actually hit the   handlebars of the person cycling
despite a full lane to the left   that could have been used to pass
Many people told me they'd stop cycling  for months years or even forever
because of events like this And then there's "rolling coal"
some diesel truck owners   get their vehicles modified
so that it burns fuel less efficiently  and emits a thick black smoke
Modifications can cost up to five thousand dollars  and are sometimes triggered 
with a switch on the dashboard  They do this so that they can 
punish people who are cycling  or anyone else they don't like
I have lost all hope for humanity There were two times in Toronto
where I was aggressively run off the   road by drivers who hated "cyclists"
and took their anger out on me  Two times where I could have been 
seriously injured or even killed  not because of what I'd done
but because of the group they associated me with  just because I dared to ride 
a bicycle on city streets I totally understand how people become 
the stereotypical "angry cyclist"  as I was starting to become one myself
Because you are constantly judged unfairly  put in a position of having to 
justify the actions of others  and have to put up with literal physical harm
just because of the stereotypes of your group  It was an eye-opening experience for me
because as a straight white cisgender man  I finally internalized what it 
was like to be judged by what   a minority group other people put me in
rather than for anything I'd done myself  The HUGE difference of course
being that I could stop cycling   at any time … So I did … (streetcar sounds)
("next stop: Dufferin street") Taking public transit in mixed traffic
was slow and unreliable  but nobody ever tried to run me over
just because I was a "transitist" I don't want to join a group
I don't want to constantly hear   lame stories of misplaced outrage
I don't want to be responsible   for the actions of others
and I don't want them to   be held responsible for my actions either
I don't want to be forced into a position   of being an activist
a spokesperson  or even an "inspiration to 
others to start cycling"  I just want to get to where I'm 
going quickly and efficiently Thankfully, but far too slowly
things are starting to change  As safer protected bicycle 
infrastructure is installed  It's attracting people of all ages who 
would otherwise never consider cycling  and it's starting to make cycling 
more of a "normal" activity  That exposure is slowly changing the culture again
because it's hard to be "anti-cyclist"  when 10 year co-workers
your sister  and three of your friends
ride a bike It's one of those things 
I didn't really appreciate  until I was living in the Netherlands for a while
I can buy groceries  visit friends
get to work  and take the kids to school
however I want  Nobody questions my choice
Nobody judges me for the actions of others  And nobody screams at me
honks at me  or tries to run me off the road
Here I'm never a "cyclist"  I'm just another guy
riding a bicycle I'd like to take this opportunity
to thank my supporters on Patreon  who pay me to complain about 
people who complain about cyclists  If you'd like to support the channel  and get access to bonus videos
visit patreon.com/notjustbikes .

How the Drug War Destroyed a Hippie Paradise in Kathmandu – Whether it's mountaineering, or marijuana.
Trekking to Everest, or tripping on LSD. Getting as high as you can has always been central to the Nepal tourist experience. This is the story of an American president who tried to nip communism in the bud by destroying a Himalayan hippie shangri-la. But in stopping the smokers he sparked a Maoist blowback. The hippie trail followed the footsteps
of the ancient Silk Road. But instead of trading textiles, its travelers swapped the post-war social conformity of the Western world for dreams of enlightenment in the East. Some were fleeing the Vietnam War draft, while others came to find themselves. For whatever reason, every year from 1965 to 1973, tens of thousands of young people bussed or hitch-hiked the overland route from Istanbul to Kathmandu. And the terminus of the hippie trail was a
single bustling urban lane, called Jhonche, rechristened by its new inhabitants as Freak Street. America's public enemy number one in the United States, is drug abuse. This will be a worldwide offensive, dealing with the problems of sources of supply as well as Americans who may be stationed abroad wherever they are in the world. A number of young Americans have become addicts as they serve abroad. Whether in Vietnam or Europe, or other places. Whether or not these young men are tuned in, they've certainly dropped out of the society they knew. Together they've quietly rejected the practical Western world, and seem not at all sure that they'll ever want to return. The hippies weren't the only ones
angered by prohibition. In western Nepal, far from the capital city of Kathmandu, hashish cultivation was the primary source of income. Sellers and growers were arrested. Private property with marijuana growing on it was forfeited to the state. The destruction of the marijuana crops pushed tens of thousands of subsistence farmers to the brink of starvation. Seeing political opportunity in economic
collapse, a communist party exploited local grievances, and persuaded residents that only a violent overthrow of the government would solve their problems. Nixon's global war on drugs was fueling
the communist ideology he was trying to contain. And we will never surrender our
friends to communist aggression. By the "Just Say No" Reagan-era, drug prohibition had opened new opportunities for corruption that led all the way to Nepal's royal family. King Birendra and I have each discovered a new friend. A blockbuster report by Nepalese journalist, Padam Thakurathi, implicated the king's brothers in Nepal's booming heroin trade. The government immediately shut down Thakurathi's newspaper. Then, at 3 o'clock in the morning, a bodyguard of the royal family entered Thakurathi's home, and aimed a gun 18 inches from his head. Shot in the face, Thakurathi survived the attack. He lost an eye, but lived to expose the royal family's involvement in black-market heroin. This is a quick escape from grim reality. Today, Nepal remains a thriving hub for heroin and hashish. With stories of drug busts, addiction, and violence, mainstays of Nepal's television news coverage. By 2006 the Maoists controlled 80% of
the country. The insurgency based in Roma had grown into a national political force that paralyzed the nation with a series of national strikes and armed resistance to the king. After a decade-long civil war that claimed 17,000 lives, Nepal's monarchy was abolished, and the Communists elected to power. The Maoist have surged ahead past both the mainstream Left Party, the UML, as well as the Nepali Congress. Today, Nepal's political situation has calmed down, and Freak Street is looking a little bit lonely. Katmandu's hippie past is running high
on nostalgia and low on foot traffic. The erstwhile hippie haven is now a hangout for hipsters. Artisanal coffee shops, outnumber head shops. And the old Eden hashish Centre is just an ordinary budget hotel. Despite a small political movement to legalize hashish, marijuana is legal one day a year, for religious purposes only. The rest of the time, tourists and locals take their chances on the black market. With its wild days behind it Freak Street has mostly dropped the drug trade, and reinvented itself as a destination for mountain trekking. These days the real action is in Thamel. A short walk from Freak Street, Kathmandu's thumping nightlife hotspot offers visitors every kind of indulgence that was available during Freak Street's heyday, and many more that the hippies couldn't have imagined on their wildest trip. And a recent retro hit is reviving Kathmandu's hippy heritage. .