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Chapter 6

source : cliffsnotes.com

Chapter 6

Summary and Analysis

Chapter 6

Summary

Hindley returns for his father’s funeral and brings a wife, Frances, along with him. Taking control of the farmhouse, Hindley immediately makes changes, moving Joseph and Nelly to the back-kitchen and prohibiting Heathcliff from receiving an education. Hindley also makes Heathcliff work in the fields. Hindley does not pay much attention to either Heathcliff or Catherine, and so they live “as savages,” skipping church and playing on the moors.

One day both Catherine and Heathcliff disappear. When they can not be found, Hindley orders the doors bolted. Nelly waits up for them, but finds out that Heathcliff returned home alone. He explains to Nelly that he and Catherine ended up near Thrushcross Grange and stole closer to peer into the windows and make fun of Edgar and Isabella, the Linton children. As Catherine and Heathcliff laugh at the Lintons, they are heard and run away. Skulker, the Linton’s dog, chases after them, biting Catherine on the ankle.

Because of her injury, Catherine is unable to get away. A servant carries her into the Grange. Mr. and Mrs. Linton are shocked at the appearance and behavior of both Catherine and Heathcliff and are unwilling to allow Heathcliff to spend the night, even as they tend to Catherine’s injury. Concerned for Catherine’s safety, Heathcliff spies on them. He sees that they treat her like a queen. After a visit from Mr. Linton, who scolded Hindley about the manner in which he raised his sister, Hindley threatens Heathcliff with banishment the next time he so much as talks to Catherine.

Analysis

Being able to roam free across the moors best illustrates the wildness of Catherine and Heathcliff’s natures. This rough freedom of Wuthering Heights contrasts with the dignified calmness of Thrushcross Grange. Similarly, the Linton children (safe, spoiled, and cowardly) serve as a contrast to Catherine and Heathcliff (self-willed, strong, and rebellious).

For the first time, a difference between Catherine and Heathcliff is revealed: She is drawn to the civility and luxury present there whereas he is repulsed by it. Ironically, Heathcliff is once again an outsider, meeting with rejection. Heathcliff will never be a welcome presence at Thrushcross Grange, but Catherine will always be treated as royalty.

Within Nelly’s narration, the events that transpired at Thrushcross Grange are told from Heathcliff’s point of view. He immediately dislikes the Lintons and what they represent, plus they now have what he cherishes most, namely Catherine. Therefore, the narrative once again becomes slightly suspect. Perhaps things occurred exactly as Heathcliff relates them or perhaps he paints a slightly skewed picture.

This chapter marks the first significant change in Catherine’s character. She experiences a whole new world at Thrushcross Grange, a world that will not and cannot contain Heathcliff. Gradually the change in Catherine will lead to a change in the relationship between Catherine and Heathcliff, whether she wants it to or not.

Glossary

delf-case a cabinet for tableware named for popular glazed earthenware, usually blue and white, originating in the city of Delft.

peevish hard to please.

flogging a beating with a strap, stick, or whip, especially as punishment.

catechised taught, especially in the principles of religion, by the method of questions and answers.

slaver saliva drooling from the mouth.

beard to face or oppose courageously or brazenly.

strong-hold a place having strong defenses; here, Mr. Linton is referring to his home, Thrushcross Grange.

negus a hot beverage made from wine, hot water, and lemon juice, sweetened and spiced.

Study English 12b Unit 2 PT Flashcards | Quizlet

Study English 12b Unit 2 PT Flashcards | Quizlet – Nelly is an unreliable narrator because her narration is colored with her feelings for the other characters. In chapter 6 of Wuthering Heights, whose description of Thrushcross Grange does Nelly report?What in the world led you wandering to Thrushcross Grange?" "Let me get off my wet clothes, and I'll tell you all about it, Nelly," he replied.Nelly is a reliable narrator because she is witness to all that happened at Wuthering Heights. B. Nelly is an unreliable narrator because her narration is colored with her feelings for the other characters. C. Nelly is an interviewer, a narrator who pieces together information from the characters after the story has taken place. D. Nelly is an

Chapter 6 | Wuthering Heights | Emily Brontë | Lit2Go ETC – This rough freedom of Wuthering Heights contrasts with the dignified calmness of Thrushcross Grange. Similarly, the Linton children (safe, spoiled, and cowardly) serve as a contrast to Catherine and Heathcliff (self-willed, strong, and rebellious).Young Catherine despairs over her cousin's sudden departure from Thrushcross Grange. Nelly tries to keep up with the news of young Linton, quizzing the housekeeper at Wuthering Heights whenever she meets her in the nearby town of Gimmerton. She learns that Heathcliff loathes his sniveling son and cannot bear to be alone with him.Explanation: In Chapter 6 of Emily Bronte's ''Wuthering Heights'', Catherine's sibling Hindley assumes responsibility for Wuthering Heights. He reassures himself by investing energy with Catherine, until he is assaulted by the Linton family. This chapter features Heathcliff's status as a pariah.

Chapter 6 | Wuthering Heights | Emily Brontë | Lit2Go ETC

The Victorian Era Post test Flashcards | Quizlet – Nelly returns to Wuthering Heights to see to the funeral arrangements, and to bring young Hareton back to Thrushcross Grange. She is shocked to learn that Hindley died deeply in debt, and that Heathcliff, who had lent Hindley large amounts of money to supply his gambling addiction, now owns Wuthering Heights.A summary of Part X (Section2) in Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Wuthering Heights and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.Chapter 6 Mr. Hindley came home to the funeral; and—a thing that amazed us, and set the neighbours gossiping right and left—he brought a wife with him. What she was, and where she was born, he never informed us: probably, she had neither money nor name to recommend her, or he would scarcely have kept the union from his father.